What is 404 error?

12Apr10

The 404 or Not Found error message is an HTTP standard response code indicating that the client was able to communicate with the server but the server could not find what was requested. 404 errors should not be confused with “server not found” or similar errors, in which a connection to the destination server could not be made at all. Another similar error is “410: Gone”, which indicates that the requested resource has been intentionally removed and will not be available again. A 404 error indicates that the requested resource may be available in the future.

When communicating via HTTP, a server is required to respond to a request, such as a web browser’s request for an HTML document (web page), with a numeric response code and an optional, mandatory, or disallowed (based upon the status code) message. In the code 404, the first “4” indicates a client error, such as a mistyped URL. The following two digits indicate the specific error encountered. HTTP’s use of three-digit codes is similar to the use of such codes in earlier protocols such as FTP and NNTP.
At the HTTP level, a 404 response code is followed by a human-readable “reason phrase”. The HTTP specification suggests the phrase “Not Found”[1] and many web servers by default issue an HTML page that includes both the 404 code and the “Not Found” phrase.
A 404 error is often returned when pages have been moved or deleted. In the first case, a better response is to return a 301 Moved Permanently response, which can be configured in most server configuration files, or through URL rewriting; in the second case, a 410 Gone should be returned. Because these two options require special server configuration, most websites do not make use of them.
404 errors should not be confused with DNS errors, which appear when the given URL refers to a server name that does not exist. A 404 error indicates that the server itself was found, but that the server cannot retrieve the requested page.

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